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Diabetes

Cope with Triggers

Cope with Triggers
Author
Lark Team

We are passionate about providing scalable virtual care. We pioneered the use of AI for better health. Combining the power of data, behavior change science, and smart devices, Lark’s digital platform provides scalable, personalized coaching 24/7 to help people manage or prevent chronic disease.

Session Focus


Coping with triggers can help you prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.

This session we will talk about:

  • Some unhealthy food shopping triggers and ways to cope with them
  • Some unhealthy eating triggers and ways to cope with them
  • Some triggers of sitting still and ways to cope with them

You will also make a new action plan!

Tips:

Instead of buying treats for your loved ones, show your love in a healthy way.
If you snack when you watch TV, avoid eating out of large containers and bags. Get yourself a single serving—and that’s all.
If you always lie on the couch and watch TV after dinner, be active during the ads.

Marta’s Story


Marta just learned that she’s at risk for type 2 diabetes. So she needs to change her eating and fitness habits.

On a typical workday, Marta gets up at 5:30 in the morning. As soon as she enters the kitchen, she starts making coffee. Just the smell helps her wake up. Then she warms up a pastry to dunk in her coffee.

By 3 in the afternoon, she’s getting drowsy again. So she stops off at the coffee machine in the staff lounge. At the vending machine, she buys herself another pastry to dunk in her coffee.

Later that evening, Marta needs to unwind after a stressful day. So she curls up on the couch and watches TV. During one of the commercial breaks, she grabs a bag of chips and a beer.

What are some of the things in Marta’s life that trigger her to act in unhealthy ways?

Marta decides to cope with her triggers. These days, she gets more sleep, so she doesn’t get as drowsy during the day. She still has her morning and afternoon coffee. But instead of having a pastry for breakfast, she has some plain nonfat yogurt with berries.

Marta stays away from the vending machine at work. Instead, she nibbles on baby carrots.

Marta still watches TV to unwind after a stressful day. But she rides a stationary bike or lifts weights while she watches it. And now she has cut-up veggies for her evening snack instead of chips and beer.

How to Cope with Triggers


It can be challenging to cope with triggers. Here are some common triggers and ways to cope with them. Write your own ideas in the column that says “Other Ways to Cope.” Check off each idea you try.

How to Cope with Triggers
How to Cope with Triggers 2
How to Cope with Triggers 2
How to Cope with Triggers 4

My Triggers


Your triggers are things in your life that you tend to react to in a certain way—without even thinking about it. They can be sights, smells, sounds, or feelings. They can also be people, places, activities, or situations.

What triggers your unhealthy shopping habits?

How will you cope with these triggers?

What triggers your unhealthy eating habits?

How will you cope with these triggers?

What triggers you to sit still, instead of being active?

How will you cope with these triggers?

Common Triggers


Common unhealthy shopping triggers:

“When we go out to the movies, we always get a big tub of popcorn to share, plus some soda.”
“My family gets a pizza every Friday night.”
“I always stop off at the taco truck during my lunch break.”
“I keep cookies on hand for when my grandkids visit.” “When I feel down, I pick up a container of ice cream.”

Common unhealthy eating triggers:

“I always have something sweet after dinner.”
“My friends and I always have chicken wings, beer, and chips while we watch the big game.”
“After church, my women’s group has coffee and donuts.”

Common triggers of sitting still:

“My friends and I sit together in the cafeteria every day during lunch.”
“I always play video games after work.”
“My family plays board games all day on Saturdays.” “When dinner is over, it’s time for TV.”