Want more tips and tricks for reaching your health goals? Join Lark!

Take our 2-minute survey to find out if you’re eligible to join Lark which includes a smart scale and the chance to earn a Fitbit®.
Start now
*Terms and conditions apply
Close icon

Interested in more health & wellness content from Lark? Let’s stay in touch.

Sign up below for more information from Lark
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.
Close icon
< Back to Resource Center
< Back to Member Blog

What to Look for on a Nutrition Label if You Have Diabetes

Natalie
Stein
September 22, 2022
What to Look for on a Nutrition Label if You Have Diabetes - Lark Health
Lark

Are you at risk of prediabetes?

Lark can help lower your risk for Type 2 Diabetes through healthy habit formation, and data tracking.
Height: 5 ft 4 in
4' 0"
7' 0"
Weight: 160 lbs
90 lbs
500 lbs
LOW RISK
Risk Level
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

What could 15% weight loss mean for you?

Feel more energetic and significantly reduce your risk of chronic conditions like diabetes and cardiovascular disease.

By clicking the button above, you agree to the Lark Terms & Conditions, Privacy Policy, and SMS Terms.

Current Weight: 250 lbs
120 lbs
500 lbs
Your weight loss could be*
- - lbs
Your new weight: -- lbs
Am I eligible?

By clicking the button above, you agree to the Lark Terms & Conditions, Privacy Policy, and SMS Terms.

*Results may vary. Based on the average weight loss in three, 68-week clinical trials of patients without diabetes who reached and maintained a dose of 2.4mg/week of GLP-1 treatment, along with a reduced-calorie diet and increased physical activity. View study here.
Thank you! Your submission has been received!
Oops! Something went wrong while submitting the form.

Reading Labels

Food labels can provide valuable information about the ingredients and nutrients in foods. You can use labels to help you choose more nutritious foods when you go grocery shopping. 

  • They can help guide you towards more nutritious types of foods.
  • They can help you decide which of two apparently similar foods or brands is healthier.

Nutrition facts panels contain a lot of information, but you do not have to read every single line for every single food. When appropriate, you might want to look for foods that are lower in:

You also generally want foods that are higher in:

  • Protein - for hunger control and blood sugar control.
  • Dietary fiber - for hunger control, blood sugar control, and heart health.

Many foods do not have labels. In fact, the foods that make up a large proportion of your diet may not be packaged. These are, of course, vegetables, fruits, and proteins such as chicken breast and lean ground turkey. You can be confident that these kinds of foods are good choices, so it is okay to purchase them even though they have no nutrition facts panel.

Beware of Added Sugars

For the first time, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) will require the nutrition labels on food packages to display added sugars. [1] This simple change is expected to prevent or delay millions of cases of diabetes and cardiovascular disease, improve quality of life, and save billions of dollars.

Sugar is a fair target for many reasons. Its consumption is linked to type 2 diabetes, as it challenges your body's insulin response and can eventually lead to high blood sugar. Did you also know that the more sugar you eat, the more likely you are to get high triglycerides, high blood pressure, and cardiovascular disease? That is before even considering that sugar often comes in a package with sodium and artery-clogging fats, which themselves are public health threats.

Total sugar is already listed on nutrition facts labels, so it is important to recognize the distinction between added and total sugars. A common way to describe sugars is to classify them as natural or added. Added sugars are those which are added to foods, often to sweeten them and sometimes to act as a thickener or preservative. White and brown sugar, honey, molasses, and corn syrup and high-fructose corn syrup are just a few of the many common types of added sugars.

Natural sugars are present innately in certain foods. Some natural sugars, such as fructose in fruit, are sweet. Others, such as lactose in milk and dairy products, are not sweet. Vegetables also have some sugars.

Natural and added sugars act the same in your body when they are the same time. That is, fructose in fruit acts the same as fructose that may be in a chocolate sandwich cookie. The main difference for health and diabetes prevention is often the package that contains the natural or added sugar.

Become a Pro!

If all this sounds like a lot, you are right... sort of. There is a lot to remember, from making a list to checking the weekly ads to reading labels in the store. On the other hand, it can become second nature if you practice it. You can even think of it as another habit that you are building as you use Lark DPP to establish a healthy lifestyle.

About Lark

Lark helps you eat better, move more, stress less, and improve your overall wellness. Lark’s digital coach is available 24/7 on your smartphone to give you personalized tips, recommendations, and motivation to lose weight and prevent chronic conditions like diabetes.

Read more

Get healthier with Lark & earn a Fitbit®

Lose weight, get more active, and eat better.
take 1-minute survey

See if Ozempic® is covered by insurance

Curb cravings and reach your weight loss goals!
AM I ELIGIBLE?

Similar posts

40 Quick and Easy Meals and Snacks with Protein40 Quick and Easy Meals and Snacks with Protein

40 Quick and Easy Meals and Snacks with Protein

Getting enough protein can help you manage hunger, maintain strength and metabolism, and support lean muscle mass.

Learn more
How to Prevent Food Triggers from Making You EatHow to Prevent Food Triggers from Making You Eat

How to Prevent Food Triggers from Making You Eat

There are several possible triggers that can lead to eating when your body is not actually hungry.

Learn more
Seven Ways to Be More Mindful When Choosing Healthy FoodsSeven Ways to Be More Mindful When Choosing Healthy Foods

Seven Ways to Be More Mindful When Choosing Healthy Foods

Mindful eating is an approach to food and eating that you can carry with you for life.

Learn more