Fiber Food List

Find the best foods that are high in fiber while keeping blood sugar stable

Dietary fiber for diabetics

Dietary fiber is a type of carbohydrate, but it is different from other types of carbohydrates in your food. Unlike sugars and starches, fiber does not pile on the calories and spiking your blood sugar. Instead, fiber benefits can include stabilizing blood sugar, lowering cholesterol levels, and improving digestion. With all those benefits of fiber, it is unfortunate that the average American consumes barely half the recommended amount of 28 grams per day for a 2,000-calorie diet.

A high-fiber food list can help you boost your fiber intake by letting you know which foods to choose. Fiber is found only in plant-based foods, not in meat or dairy products, and it is higher in less-processed foods (say, whole grain bread or an apple) than in more-processed foods (say, white bread or apple juice). The nutrition facts panel can show you the grams of fiber in each serving of a food, and if you cannot find a food label, you can make a good guess by choosing the following foods:

  • Vegetables.

  • Whole and other high-fiber grains.

  • Legumes (beans, peas, lentils).

  • High-fiber fruit.

  • Nuts and seeds.

Fiber in Vegetables (Choose fresh or unsalted frozen)
Food, Serving Size Fiber, Grams Total Carbohydrates, Grams Sugar, Grams Calories
Broccoli, 1 cup
5
11
2
55
Cabbage, 1 cup
3
7
4
33
Eggplant, 1 cup
3
9
3
35
Green beans, 1 cup
4
10
2
44
Red pepper, 1 large
3
10
7
42
Kale, 1 cup
3
7
2
36
Green peas, ½ cup
4
11
4
62
Sweet potato, 1 small
4
24
7
103
Potato, 1 medium
4
37
2
161
Winter Squash, 1 cup
9
30
7
115
Fiber in Grains and Cereals (Choose unsweetened whole grains)
Food, Serving Size Fiber, Grams Total Carbohydrates, Grams Sugar, Grams Calories
Whole-wheat bread, 1 small slice
2
10
1
60
Whole-wheat macaroni, ½ cup cooked
4
37
1
174
Unsweetened shredded wheat
6
40
0
170
Oatmeal, ½ cup uncooked
4
27
1
150
Brown rice, ½ cup cooked
2
22
1
108
Bran flakes, ¾ cup
5
23
5
110
Quinoa, ½ cup cooked
3
20
0
111
Pearled barley, ½ cup cooked
3
22
0
97
Popcorn, air-popped, 3 cups
4
19
0
93
Rye crackers, 1 oz.
4
22
0
101
Fiber in Legumes (Choose dried legumes or low-sodium cans)
Food, Serving Size Fiber, Grams Total Carbohydrates, Grams Sugar, Grams Calories
Lentils, ½ cup
8
20
2
115
Black beans, ½ cup
6
23
1
105
Kidney beans, ½ cup
7
22
3
100
Pinto beans, ½ cup
7
18
0
100
Split peas, ½ cup
8
21
3
115
Veggie burger, 1 patty
4
8
1
130
Lentil soup, 1 cup
5
29
1
160
Fiber in Fruit (Choose fresh or unsweetened frozen whole fruits)
Food, Serving Size Fiber, Grams Total Carbohydrates, Grams Sugar, Grams Calories
Raspberries, 1 cup
8
15
5
64
Blackberries
8
15
7
62
Strawberries, 1 cup
3
12
7
49
Orange, 1 large
3
18
12
69
Apple, 1 large
5
32
23
115
Avocado, ¼ cup
4
5
0
92
Pear, 1 medium
6
28
17
103
Banana, 1 medium
3
27
14
105
Fiber of Nuts, Seeds, and Peanuts (Unsalted/low-sodium nuts and seeds, and nut and peanut butter without added sugars)
Food, Serving Size Fiber, Grams Total Carbohydrates, Grams Sugar, Grams Calories
Almonds, 1 oz.
4
6
1
164
Peanuts, 1 oz.
2
6
1
161
Pecans, 1 oz.
3
4
1
198
Pistachios, 1 oz.
3
8
2
159
Hazelnuts, 1 oz.
3
5
1
178
Pumpkin seeds, 1 oz.
3
7
1
165
Flaxseed, 1 oz.
8
8
0
151
 

Most Americans can benefit from increasing their fiber consumption, but may need help. Lark is a personal health coach that can help you build healthy habits, including choosing higher-fiber foods more easily. Your Lark health coach can assist in areas such as wellness, weight loss, diabetes or prediabetes management, and hypertension to make health a natural part of your life.

 

Natalie Stein

Exercise, Fitness & Nutrition Expert | Assistant Professor of Public Health